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Aug 02

On The Spot Blog stirs up Rachel at Cardholder Services

Author’s Note: If you’re finding this site after reading about “Rachel at Cardholder Services” on NBCNews.com, welcome! To see all the stories about “Rachel”, please click here

When I started writing what became the “Rachel” series back in May, I thought I could take some newly discovered data and create a posting or two. Little did I know as I got into it, that I was going to open up so much information that it took four articles to fully explore the truth behind the scam.

Overflowing Mailbox

After the articles started appearing, I noticed a slight uptick in visitors to the site. While I don’t post as much as I like to, the four posts, being pre-written, could go up on a set schedule. I didn’t think much of it, but the site experienced a 10-fold increase in daily visitors. The pattern was common – everybody wanted information on Rachel and how to stop her.

I followed much of the comments that visitors posted here and on Facebook, and realized that people were wanting to share what they learned. I am still sorting through it and will likely do another follow-up this fall, or as new information comes in on the story.

At the end of June, an Investigator with the Federal Trade Commission Bureau of Consumer Protection contacted me. He had seen the articles and wanted to tap my knowledge for more information. We spoke for more than an hour, and I found out that the Division of Marketing Practices, which is responsible for the Do Not Call list consists of only 30 Investigators, responsible not only for the Do Not Call List but Internet Fraud.

Rachel (and more recently the complete a survey get a cruise scam) is very high on their radar. They were the ones that brought charges last December against Castle Rock Capital Management. The case is still pending.

Most of our conversation was on technical solutions, and is not likely to interest most, but was made aware of a public summit being held in Washington D.C. on October 18th, of which I may take part.

Also, the FTC launched a new mini-site in July, featuring much of the information shared on these pages:

http://www.ftc.gov/robocallsFinally, this week, Herb Weisbaum, of ConsumerMan.com and NBCNews.com contacted me as a part of researching a story he was working on. I provided some input into an article on Rachel, which is available here.

Again, I appreciate all the feedback, and will continue to update the site as I get more information on the attempts to finally stop Rachel.

About the author

Michael Jones

Michael Jones is the founder of On The Spot Communications and On The Spot Blog.

A native of Ottawa, Kansas (approximately 60 miles South-West of Kansas City), he was born in the early 70's and lived most of his early life without traveling far from home.

He has since lived in Lenexa, Kansas (suburb of Kansas City), Houston, Texas, and now resides in Frisco, Texas (north of Dallas, Texas). He has had the experience of traveling to Tokyo, Japan and Tel Aviv, Israel, as well as numerous places around the USA.

A self-professed computer geek, when Michael's not working in his telecommunications job, he enjoys Model Railroading and Paintball.

Michael Jones is the founder of On The Spot Communications and On The Spot Blog.
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  • aparrently the ftc isn’t doing much i and hundreds of others have filed complaints and nothing is being done, our tax dollars at waste.

  • These calls should have been stopped long ago. Too bad the government would rather waste time, money, and effort on undeclared, imperialistic wars all over the planet.

  • TomiNYC

    “Rachel’s” calls have increased, not decreased. I now receive a voice message every day. The numbers change, but it’s good ‘ol “rRachel”. Yesterday they called me from area code 813; last week, the week before that etc. were area code 417; before that it was area code 407. The company id on my Caller ID is always “V” followed by a long series of numbers. I use Vonage, and the only way to reject a call is if there is no company name, so besides spoofing numbers, they just use a series of numbers as a company id I guess. I want to have my Attorney General and Sshumer here in NYC to someting, but I can’t give them much info on who they are to prosecute them.

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